ROGER HODGSON Interview, Madrid, 2nd June 2000

ROGER HODGSON Interview, Madrid, 2nd June 2000

Más...

INTERVIEW WITH ROGER HODGSON IN MADRID

Hotel Villa Real, 2nd June 2000, 3 pm

rogmadrid1


The four founder members of BIS (Jordi, Guillermo, Jose Antonio and Jorge) and Roger were present. Danijela Bogdanovic joined in during the chat. We comfortably seated around a round table, at the hotel restaurant. My intention was to start the already third interview to Roger in two years, but as our relationship with the English man has become more of a friendship than that of "fans around their idol", the meeting became an informal chat since the beginning...


Roger Hodgson.- I wanna know what you think of the album, I haven't asked you yet... 'Cause I've been checking the postings and none of the old fans have posted, neither you guys, or Peggy or...

Jorge Cassinello.- Do you mean in the guestbook?

RH.- Yeah

JC.- Well, lately we have been very busy, preparing this... not only the interview just to meet each other and to see you here in Spain... we were discussing about the album but in the mailing list we've got...

RH.- Aha, in the ONE mailing list?

JC.- ONElist

RH.- Yeah, ONElist... what do you do? you write something and then you smell it everyone?

JC.- Exactly
Jose Antonio Alvarez.- You can use it in the way you want to. You can receive only one message daily...

JC.- The whole messages altogether, or anytime that someone sends a message you receive it... If you are curious you may use a nickname nobody knows and a different e-mail address, something like hotmail or similar, which is not your real e-mail address... you might want to join in and see what everybody is saying. Because sometimes people expect you are reading this mailing list, something that you know is not exactly that way, because you are not belonging to it, but you might try...

RH.- I got a lot of things I gotta do; my mailing list I gotta get together; Jason has it, my book keeper has part of it; it's like it's all over the place... gotta bring everything that I can control...

JC.- Before starting we'd like to know which is your impression about the show...

RH.- First I wanna know your impression of the album, do you enjoy the album?

JC.- Oh, really? Yeah, we love it!

RH.- Yeah?

JC.- Well, any of us can say what he thinks about the album. For me it's the best thing you have done solo since you left Supertramp. In some aspects you can compare it with the style of Even In The Quiestest Moments, to Breakfast In America and some things from Famous Last Words... the last part of Supertramp when you were with them. It's not like Crime Of The Century, it's different, a different style... My impression is very positive. It is true that probably there are too many ballads...

RH.- Yeah

JC.- But for me is OK, although you haven't included Danielle, but this is something we will comment later... There is something we would complain about... and it's about Hungry, we wouldn't have chosen that as a single...

RH.- Aha

JC.- And it's different from the rest, it's not following the same path. It is probably too commercial; in some aspects for us, at least for me, it reminds me a bit of Hai Hai, and it's not precisely the album I prefer, although I like it but... so I don't know really why you have chosen Hungry, but anyway you've got time later to explain. And it's quite curious, probably it means something, you haven't played it live, so I suppose there must be a reason for that. But I love the album, it's the best you've got so far, and it's better than some of the old Supertramp ones...
(now we turned to Jose Antonio...)

Jordi Sabater.- It's your turn

JC.- What do you think about it?

JAA.- It's really a great album, for me it's the best of the ones you have released... well it's a question in the interview later, but I'd like to ask you about the... hmm, I understand there are two kind of songs in this album, the ballads ones,
and other ones more instrumental, more orchestrated... for me I prefer this kind of ballads, is this the way you are heading in music now?

RH.- Is that in the questions? (Roger refers to the piece of paper I've got with the questions written)

JC.- It's going to be asked...

RH.- Well, OK (link to the answer)
Guillermo Puente.- Err...

JC.- Come on Guille!

RH.- It's good, you guys get a taste of what it's like to be interviewed... it's good... (Roger enjoys the situation)

GP.- Err...

JS.- Introduce yourself first...

GP.- Well, I am Guille, I am 29, I am from Seville... well I love...

RH.- The best looking...

JC.- You're the prettiest!

RH.- Yeah
(we are easily getting into a joking atmosphere)

GP.- I really love the album... for me the surprise maybe has been Along Came Mary, because it's a song that I didn't like very much in the beginning, when you did it live in the first...

RH.- In Málaga...?

GP.- No, not in Málaga, I think in Paris.

RH.- Yeah

GP.- With your son. And with all these new arrangements and instruments the result has been fantastic. And my favourite maybe is Love Is A Thousand Times; I have listened to that song like one hundred times but I never get tired of listening to it, it's fantastic... And Say Goodbye and The Garden has been a good choice. But The Garden is too short, the first time that I listened to it was in Profiles In Rock, the BBC program, and it was like one minute, just with the pump organ... and now...

RH.- It is the same length.

GP.- OK... I enjoyed last night the version of Open The Door, it must be complicated to play it by yourself... without a band.

RH.- Aha. Well, it works though.

JC.- It worked, people were very happy.

GP.- I like also the new version of Showdown, it's more folky. Well... I was the first in buying the CD in Seville!

JC.- And I was as well the first to buy the ticket here in Madrid... although I haven't used it eventually... we haven't used our tickets! We've got our tickets but because we were in the soundcheck we didn't need to...

JS.- We promise you we have bought them! (laughs...)
(some coffees are given to us by a waiter)

JS.- I like Say Goodbye. It is a song that makes me stay listening... And also Death And A Zoo... I remember yesterday in the show, when you sang it and then later Say Goodbye, I was just looking at the people and they got surprised... not from the point of viw of a new song, because all were singing, but I think surprised from the song itself...

RH.- Just being different?

JS.- I don't know, but I perceived a different reaction...

JC.- But negative or positive?

JS.- No! absolutely positive. Very emotional.

JC.- And there was a different reaction listening to Time Waits For No One. Also quite amazed...

RH.- Yeah

JC.- Because it's a different style, it's all the prone you like to add to some songs, they are slow and very very repetitive...

JS.- And some of us were surprised with Carlos, the way of playing flute, because we didn't see him before, because he really feels...

RH.- He's a very good musician.

JC.- I told you two years ago, you fit very well with Celtic styles... and that's true.

RH.- Yeah. There's a song on... you know, I wrote a song with Carlos Nuñez. On his new album, it's going out soon I think, it's his first composition. He sent me a tape with some ideas and I liked one piece and it was his first composition...

JC.- Because he usually doesn't compose...

RH.- No, he plays other people's. So this was his first idea, and I liked it! I heard this melody, so I put a melody and wrote some lyrics...

JC.- You sing along?

RH.- Yes, it's on the album. It's good, it's a nice little song.

JS.- So that was my opinion on the album... The other day, we were not at the stage and we were so tired...

JC.- How can you stand up, how can you bear all such an effort?

RH.- Uufff... hehe, I don't know, I don't know...

GP.- Didn't you have any idea about the schedule before taking land in Barcelona? You didn't know anything about your plans...?

RH.- I knew that Spain it was going to be very very heavy, yeah.

GP.- Because we told you at the airport: "see you in the television studio in Tele 5", and you were surprised, you didn't have any idea that you were going to record a song.

RH.- Yeah, I just was going from one to the other (Roger smiles and refers to our presence at the airport and the people from Sony Spain...). It's great, Sony are really supporting this album, they really believe in this album; so they asked me to be here for a week, and I said: " ah, I cannot be here for a week..." But they could...

JAA.- About the show in Madrid... someone told us, the manager of the venue, Sala Arena, that half of the tickets were sold in the same day of the show, due to radio advertisements... We were surprised because there were no posters, no publicity in the streets... you know, but in Paris there were a lot... We have seen only three posters, in front of the venue...
(apparently there was nothing else in the whole city...)

RH.- It's been strange... it's been a funny tour because it's not an official tour. Sony have invested in the tour, so it's like a promotion tour, really for the media. The reason I'm doing it at all it's because I said to Sony "I want to do some shows as part of the promotion..." Otherwise all I'm doing is speaking... I much prefer, for the media specially to see me perform, 'cause they have a picture of who I am now and they are not just talking about who I was 20 years ago...

JC.- But they've got some problems with some of the TV shows... one of them wanted you to play live with an orchestra, with a whole band, and eventually there was no recording because Sony couldn't give that... did you know that?

RH.- Well, that's probably right, I can't at the moment...

JC.- Yeah, at the moment you can't but it's ridiculous, because you can do it perfectly full live without any band!

RH.- Some songs... I can't do Hungry.

JC.- Or Showdown...

RH.- Showdown I can, but it doesn't sound...

JC.- You can't do Hungry?

RH.- No. See Hungry... I'll tell the story about Hungry. It was a demo, this version is a demo I did ten years ago. I wrote something on the piano that was quite catchy and then I wrote the lyrics to it, I put it in my computer, cut it out, changed the keys and everything... so after I changed the keys now I cannot play it... (laughs)

JC.- My god, it's a computer song!

RH.- It is, it's a computer song, yeah.

JC.- It's a Hai Hai song in a way...

RH.- It's not a song like Take The Long Way Home, that I could play and sing, it was a manufactured song. And at the time I did the vocal, the time I wrote on them, I didn't like it particularly. And that is what it's been released today; we put new drums on it, real bass, saxophone, slide guitar... but it's basically still the demo from 1990.

JC.- Well... let's get into some questions... I wanted to ask you about the concept, if there is, of Open The Door. To me it's like you are just referring to "open the door to a new life", is it the motto or the whole concept more or less?
Although at the end of the album you highlight a phrase: "There is nothing that we know, just watch the magic flow...."

RH.- There's not a "grand concept", the concept is really what it means to me... yeah you're right, Open The Door is just basically me saying "OK, I'm ready, let's go". To me there is a theme on the album: which is "letting go", "say goodbye to
the old way", and which ends with "letting go"... What it's been interesting doing all these interviews is really it helps me to define what it all means, where I am... so for me "letting go" is very much letting go of my attachment with Supertramp,
because although I left the band I was still... truly letting go off that name and everything was difficult, specially when no one else lets go, you know, when one is saying when are we going back with Supertramp? So I really have let it go now, I
have made peace with it, and it's only because I'm feeling strong now and I don't wanna go back, I'm really looking forward now. So, I'm ready to go through the door! So, I'm saying "OK, let's go through the door and now I'm ready to leave the past behind".

JC.- Like a new birth?

RH.- Yeah!

JC.- Because there is a child at the back, although you are not referring there to re-incarnation I guess...

RH.- Well, the child is a... I love the whole thing of the man rediscovering his child, because for me I can't take everything too seriously. If I start taking life too seriously then... you know...

JC.- You would stop...

RH.- Yes, so basically for me the man discovering his little child means that I'm having fun again, if it ever stops becoming fun to me, I'll stop again (Roger smiles). So it's important not to get too hung up, I mean, this album says many things but I like the fact that the final words are that "after all I've said we really don't know anything, let's just enjoy life,
watch the magic..."

JC.- And the magic is like a rainbow... I mean...

RH.- Yeah, rainbow is such a positive symbol and it represents whatever you wanna make it, I'm not defining it, it's totally symbolic... You know, there is so much darkness in the world that a rainbow can but help.

JC.- Ah... we wanted to talk about every song... let's start with Along Came Mary... we know that Mary is somebody you even don't know who is (laughs)... what about including the Queen's speech at the beginning? And precisely... you know, it tried
to be a positive speech because it was during war times, hard times...

RH.- Ah... we came across it, Alan and I were listening to a lot of speeches, I have some CDs of speeches, we came across that, it's just so real, that speech, and for some reason it doesn't have anything to do with Along Came Mary but it was just like a really interesting way to start the album. Just it has a way to take whoever is listening to the album... take them from where they are...

JC.- "Oh my god... this is the radio!"

RH.- Yeah, the way you drop people into an album is important, and if you just start with a song sometimes people are ready for a song, but if they cannot catch it... "wow, what's that?" Then you've got their attention. And why I like this speech is because it seems to be a really great way to see how far we've changed in fifty or sixty years, 'cause she is saying "I wish all the best to our gallant soldiers and sailors and airmen... on the battlefields..." It was in war times you know, it's
like... you wouldn't hear that today! And this is a twelve year old child, so I found it very interesting. I like the fact that a child starts the album, even though it's Princess Elisabeth, and then children finish the album too. It's kind of a nice...

JC.- Circle?

RH.- Circle, yeah.

JC.- What's the meaning of the morse code?

RH.- It says "open the door".

JC.- Yeah, we guessed that, but we were not sure...

RH.- And it's nice, in a hundred years people will be saying "morse what?"

rogmadrid2 

JC.- About The More I Look, it's quite obvious there is a change in the lyrics, because the start reflects a sort of pragmatic but also pessimistic view... you say "the more that life asks of me...", but you ended saying "the more that life
gives to me", so it's a sort of a change when you realize "that these things were meant to be"... so is this the way you see it? You're trying to see the optimistic view?

RH.- Oh, again, it was interesting, the lyrics I sang, the vocal is from the time I did the demo with Trevor Rabin, but I changed one line: the very last one said "the more that life takes from me", and I changed "the more that life gives to me".
So I think that probably actually, looking back on it, see this is something I've discovered about myself; when I wrote "takes from me" that was the way I was feeling, but I decided to changed it to "gives to me" because this is more positive.

JC.- Congratulations! Showdown is quite better now...

RH.- Aha, yeah.

JC.- Why have you chosen Ronald Reagan and Jesse Jackson speeches?

RH.- Well, they fit perfectly. The rhythm of Jesse Jackson is perfect and he's got a beautiful speech if you listen to it, very beautiful. So I was inspired by that speech. And Ronald Reagan, what he says is politicians are not the answer:
"government is not the solution to the problem, it is the problem"; and that's why he was elected President... ironically... that praise. So it would just seem to have Ronald Reagan saying what the song is saying makes it even more powerful.

JC.- Although when he became the President obviously he changed...

RH.- Yeah, he changed obviously...

JC.- And are we actually heading for a showdown? What do you think?

RH.- Well I think we're definitely inferring some surprises, yeah. We seem to be ignoring all the warning signs...

JC.- But something is happening...

RH.- Everywhere... yeah! I mean, economic prosperity has made us so very complacent and apathetic, and I think apathy is the most dangerous thing in the world today... really. And it's very easy to be when you're comfortable... and meanwhile the earth is suffering, the ocean is suffering, the environment is suffering, the air is suffering... the quality of life can be really pretty scaring. So, there's gonna be a wake up caller , some point, maybe ten maybe fifty years, who knows...

JC.- About Hungry you have already told us, but anyway was it your idea to chose it as a single? Are you happy with the final result?

RH.- Yeah, I'm happy, I know it's a lighter song, it's not one of my favourite songs, but I'm not naive, today you gotta have something that would get on the radio, otherwise you could get bury very quickly... if your album is not a priority with the
record company it will not be heard, that's the bottom line, so you'd better give them some amenation to work with... and they did see Hungry as a single, it's a good way of connecting, it sounds very old, it sounds a little bit like Supertramp by
the saxophone... so it helps people to connect me with my past and "wow, there's that sound!" Next single is probably gonna be Open The Door, which is a bit more adventurous...


JC.- The same length? eight minutes?

RH.- No, basically the stage version, what I played last night on stage... all the up-tempo.

GP.- What about Love Is A Thousand Times as a single?

RH.- Yeah, a lot of people like that song, but...

GP.- It was very successful in your first shows.

RH.- Yeah I know.

JC.- Some people have compared it with Give A Little Bit...

RH.- I think it's easy to come with Love Is A Thousand Times or even The More I Look when you're established with a bit more high energy. Ballads are a little risky to come with first time... so, The More I Look, probably, is gonna be number three... and then Love Is A Thousand Times...

JC.- You have used Grand Ma to record some songs... which ones?

RH.- Aha, The Garden...

JC.- Say Goodbye?

RH.- No, actually Say Goodbye on a church organ. But it was written on Grand Ma.

JC.- Danielle...

RH.- Danielle was... that was church organ too. That's one reason why Danielle is not on the album, 'cause we had two church organ songs that sounded a little similar, and it was like repeating myself.
(JAA raises a question related to the fact that Roger might play or not a particular song depending on the tune of the guitar)

JAA.- Along Came Mary is played on the guitar tuned in a different...

RH.- Yeah, open G.

JAA.- The same tune that Desert Love?

RH.- Ah... no, in Desert Love the bottom E-string is turned down.

JC.- Death And A Zoo is a great song as well, and it's got something special, it is placed in our warmest memories obviously, because we were so lucky to see it live in Holland... I feel particularly moved by it because I work with captive animals, and I know how stressed they might be... although I know you actually refer to us, human beings caught in a cage in a way...
Are you happy with the final result of the song in the album? But you have soften your cries in the record, your voice sounds lower... and the instruments sound stronger...

RH.- Yeah, it was a difficult song. I'm not totally happy with it on the record. I'm pleased the least on my singing part, it was very difficult to find the right balance and combination of sounds and put my voice in the right place... and then the
animal chase doesn't have the crescendo that I wanted, I want a really build up and then have a... (Rogers claps his hands once).

JC.- But it's stressful.

RH.- Yeah, it's a great idea, a lot of it works, but I wanted it to even get more scary before a creaking door... SLAM!
(Roger imitates the slam sound of a big door...) I couldn't find that...

JC.- You couldn't find the proper door... You could go to "the old lady house" where you bought Grand Ma, maybe there was a door there...
(Roger laughs...)

JC.- Probably you've got more recordings, more special effects, because when I was in Unicorn you showed me even helicopters...

RH.- Well, that was for another piece, one song called Evolution.

JC.- Now... who is Sevik the Wolf?

RH.- Sevik is my daughter Heidi's dog... she bought two wolf hybrids, they are about ninety per cent wolf. And they were outside where I sleep and the female was on heat, and we had both tied, the male and the female, away from each other, and the male was going crazy, you know...

JC.- I can understand... (we laugh...).

RH.- You know... trying to get to the female... and he woke up every two hours and through the night and started howling, so I had a dub player by the window and every time I heard him howling I woke up, turned the dub player on...

JC.- Is he in the song?

RH.- Yeah, that's him! That's him howling for his girl... wooow.... (Roger howls...).

JC.- At the beginning of the song...

RH.- Yeah... no, all the howls are him. And then he escaped... he's a very happy boy.

JC.- We know that you changed your mind many times just to include or not to include Say Goodbye, we would like to know whether the fact that all the fans around wanted this song to be included in the album, sending messages to the guestbook, etc., has had any influence in your final decision...

RH.- Yeah, that influenced me... I went back and tried to make it work again... for me the rhythm of Say Goodbye was really strange 'cause I did it on church organ, and when you play a church organ you press the keys and then there is half a second before the sound comes... so it's very difficult to get the rhythm going... and then it was hard to sing to the rhythm being a bit funny... So I wasn't quite happy with it...

JC.- Then you added the harpsichord...

RH.- And then I added the harpsichord... that added some definition to it. I think it's OK.

JC.- Why have you included the Spanish "palmas", you know "palmas", clapping hands...?

RH.- Yeah.

JC.- ... and the Spanish guitar in Open The Door?

RH.- It was Alan's idea...

JC.- Oh... what a disappointment! (joking... laughs)

RH.- Alan has some crazy ideas, you know, and I learned to trust his intuition. And it worked very well...

JC.- For Every Man is a song by Alan Simon... completely?

RH.- No completely, it's the melody... how is it...? (Roger tries to remember...). I think it's his melody, I wrote the lyrics...

JC.- Comparing that song with the other two in Excalibur you sing and Alan composed, it seems that Alan may compose songs very appropriate to your style... or maybe is it that any song performed by you starts to bright and reflect your unique blend?

RH.- Well, this particular song (For Every Man) I just really loved it when he first played it to me, and I thought I could help to finish it... I'm pretty good at hearing other people's songs and see where they wanna go, it's something very easy
for me, and I enjoy doing it too.

JC.- Well, we know now why you haven't included Danielle, we suspected it was too similar to some of the songs of the album... are you going to include it in some single?

RH.- It's really up to each record company... I mean, Germany is using it as the next track for the first ten thousand CDs I think... France is on a single, with Hungry...

JC.- But Germany is going to substitute... which song?

RH.- No, just add... I think so.

JC.- So eleven songs... Oh wow! we should buy that...

JAA.- This song was on the internet to be download...

RH.- Is it on the internet? is it on the web site?
(Roger didn't know that...)

JAA.- Yeah... it was.

JC.- Now this question is the question you have asked us. Which is your general impression on the album? Don't you think this is your best album till date? or wouldn't you say that Open The Door, if well promoted, it will bring back a general
recognition...? I know this is what you expect but do you really think is going to work? So far, what do you think? How is it going?

RH.- I think it's gonna be really well, I think it's gonna bring me back to... with a lot of work and support behind it.
'Cause nowadays it's very difficult for something to really (Roger clicks his fingers) hit... it's not an album is gonna hit people over the head, I don't think. It's gonna be just word of mouth... "have you heard of..." (Roger whispers...). And plus Sony support... so, but you know this is just Europe too... I gotta think about America and everywhere else too... it's gonna be a lot of work.

JC.- Why have't you included any picture of you inside the CD?

RH.- I really didn't think about it!

JC.- Trying to avoid too similar songs in an album, I suppose that if you compose different songs with different rhythms you would even do probably a double CD sometimes... wouldn't you?

RH.- We worked on it. We started out doing a double CD this time, but it just take so long... that we just put it down one CD...

JC.- Next time...?

RH.- I would always love to do a double CD, but if I can find a way to record quicker, which is difficult. This is quick enough, only four months.

JC.- Can you tell us any name of new songs for the next album? I remember you told us in last interview in Rennes about The Journey...

RH.- Aha.

JC.- For instance, is Evolution going to be included?

RH.- Yeah, I think Evolution will be on it. There's a song called Walk About.

JC.- You played during the sound check two new songs, didn't you?

RH.- Aha.

GP.- You played a first one with the guitar...

RH.- Yeah, I was teasing you.
(laughs)

RH.- I knew you were there "OK I'll..." (Roger is obviously joking) All My Sister I played on the keyboard and then Mother Dear on the guitar...

JC.- And probably they are going to be in the new album...

RH.- Hmm... I'm not sure.

JC.- Lone Child is going not to be...

RH.- No, I don't think so... at some point I'll probably do Lone Child.

JC.- And Teach Me To Love Again or Keep The Pigeons Warm?

RH.- Keep The Pigeons Warm probably will be.

JAA.- Brother St. Paul? It's a very nice song.

RH.- Hmm... I don't know. I want to do it, but I just don't know. The Journey, there'll be a song called Everyone Dies, and a song called Walk About...

JC.- Walk About was a very catchy one you played when I was in Unicorn. I remember you were very happy with it.

RH.- Yeah, I know, I love it, it's really a great song.

JC.- And what about those songs...? I remember you showed another demo, it was similar to Dreamer and you said "I'm not happy with that", it was too old...

RH.- I Can Tell 'Bout Your Eyes You Are A Friend (Roger sings just this phrase...). A little bit similar to Dreamer...

JC.- Maybe some time you can sort of do a CD of demos or rare singles and songs...

RH.- I think I'll just gonna put them on the web site, for people to enjoy that.

JC.- And now the question of whether you are heading to ballads or not...

RH.- I expect the next album to be more intense; this album is quite acoustic, quite ballady... there'll be more electric guitar and it'll be a bit more powerful... I mean, Open The Door is powerful but is light.

JC.- Yeah, I think Open The Door is very powerful from the inside.

RH.- It's an easy album to put on. People would play it and makes them feel good, that's what it does for me, good feeling up. The next album is more... 'cause there were some songs that I wanted to go... There's a song called Ham Ham, a very
intense song, but it did not go on Open The Door, it was everyone in America's favourite song by far... they said it's better than anything else that I've done, but when I got it to France no one could understand it.

JC.- Can you sing a bit?

RH.- It's not really a song... it's a... it's just very powerful, it's very broody and moody, the lyrics are incredibly cynical and biting... wow... and then there's a big speech at the end by this guy Guillian Cooper who is a real kinda fanatic... you get a dizzy feeling... "wow!!" It got digeridoo in it, droning... I love it!

JC.- Did you play it with the Rites Of Passage band?

RH.- It's also got Chris Squire of Yes singing on it, with Trevor Rabin is doing at the end, Alan White is drumming on it. It was from that period, Yes started it... But I brought it to France and it just went over the heads...

JC.- 'Cause this album is more Frenchy...

RH.- It's definitely more French. You have to get the support of where you are, so for Ham Ham the French will maybe scratch their heads, whereas the Americans will love it.

JC.- Well, Showdown is more American.

RH.- It is, yeah, but it's still pretty light... it could've been more guitar.

JC.- Why there is no electric guitar in this album?

RH.- I ran out of time and space, you know. I had all these exotic instruments and after that... where do I put a guitar? there was no place left!

JC.- What is a rebec? It's like a violing, isn't it?

RH.- Yeah

JC.- It's great in Danielle and in The Garden, it's like a cry.

RH.- Yes, it's very powerful...

Then Danijela took a couple of pictures of BIS team and Roger...

JC.- You haven't learnt any Spanish...!

RH.- Oh, I'm so full of French that I can't...
...

JC.- Thank you Danijela for everything...
Danijela Bogdanovic.- Thank YOU.

What a great atmosphere, friendship and rainbows all over the room... and the door was open!!
Thank you Roger, once more... yours always!

You are here: Inicio Interviews ROGER HODGSON Interview, Madrid, 2nd June 2000